Transparency International’s 2008 Corruption Perceptions Index

Central America Ranking: Costa Rica 47, El Salvador 67, Panamá 85, Guatemala 96, Honduras 126, Nicaragua 134.

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

With countries such as Somalia and Iraq among those showing the highest levels of perceived corruption, Transparency International’s (TI) 2008 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), launched today, highlights the fatal link between poverty, failed institutions and graft. But
other notable backsliders in the 2008 CPI indicate that the strength of oversight mechanisms is also at risk among the wealthiest.
“In the poorest countries, corruption levels can mean the difference between life and death, when money for hospitals or clean water is in play,” said Huguette Labelle, Chair of Transparency International. “The continuing high levels of corruption and poverty plaguing many of the world’s societies amount to an ongoing humanitarian disaster and cannot be tolerated. But even in more privileged countries, with enforcement disturbingly uneven, a tougher approach to tackling corruption is needed.”

The 2008 Results
The Transparency International CPI measures the perceived levels of public-sector corruption in a given country and is a composite index, drawing on different expert and business surveys. The 2008 CPI scores 180 countries (the same number as the 2007 CPI) on a scale from zero (highly corrupt) to ten (highly clean).
Denmark, New Zealand and Sweden share the highest score at 9.3, followed immediately by Singapore at 9.2. Bringing up the rear is Somalia at 1.0, slightly trailing Iraq and Myanmar at 1.3 and Haiti at 1.4.
While score changes in the Index are not rapid, statistically significant changes are evident in certain countries from the high to the low end of the CPI. Looking at source surveys included in both the 2007 and 2008 Index, significant declines can be seen in the scores of Bulgaria, Burundi, Maldives, Norway and the United Kingdom. Similarly, statistically significant improvements over the last year can be identified in Albania, Cyprus, Georgia, Mauritius, Nigeria, Oman, Qatar, South Korea, Tonga and Turkey.

More on this topic

Central America, Where Corruption Reigns

December 2013

The majority of Central American nations are perceived as being the most corrupt in Latin America.

The Index of Corruption Perception created by Transparency International, ranks Honduras, Guatemala and Nicaragua in the list of countries perceived as the most corrupt.

Honduras is ranked at number 140, while Nicaragua and Guatemala are located in positions 127 and 123, respectively.

Corruption Getting Worse in Central America

December 2011

With the exception of Honduras, which reported a slight improvement, all countries in the region reported significant drops in the new edition of the Corruption Perception Index, by Transparency International.

In 2011 Costa Rica remained the best positioned in Central America, but fell from position 41 to 50, followed by El Salvador, which fell from 73 to 80, Panama (73 to 86), Guatemala (91 to 120) , Honduras (climbed from 134 to 129) and Nicaragua (dropped from 127 to 134).

The 2009 Corruption Perceptions Index

November 2009

Costa Rica shows an index of 5.3, followed by El Salvador, Guatemala and Panama with 3.4, Honduras y Nicaragua with 2.5.

The CPI measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption in a given country and is a composite index, drawing on 13 different expert and business surveys. The 2009 edition scores 180 countries, the same number as the 2008 CPI.

Transparency International’s 2008 Corruption Perceptions Index

September 2008

Central America Ranking: Costa Rica 47, El Salvador 67, Panamá 85, Guatemala 96, Honduras 126, Nicaragua 134.

With countries such as Somalia and Iraq among those showing the highest levels of perceived corruption, Transparency International’s (TI) 2008 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), launched today, highlights the fatal link between poverty, failed institutions and graft. But

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