Trade: Panama-Costa Rica Blockade Gains Support

Given the blockade that has been in place since July 2020 to the entry of animal products from Costa Rica into the Panamanian market, the Panamanian guild of poultry farmers supports the actions taken by the Cortizo administration.

Tuesday, January 19, 2021

At the beginning of the second semester of 2020 the commercial conflict between both countries began, since Panama informed the National Animal Health Service (SENASA), an agency of the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock of Costa Rica (MAG), about the decision not to extend the authorization for export to a list of Costa Rican establishments previously authorized and that have been commercializing in the Panamanian market for many years.

Because the trade dispute has not been resolved, the Costa Rican government decided to send a request to open the consultation mechanism to the World Trade Organization (WTO) on January 11, 2021.

In this context, the National Association of Poultry Farmers of Panama (Anavip) issued a statement on January 18, in which they support the actions of the Panamanian government.

"We support the National Government for ensuring that our phyto-sanitary and zoo heritage is respected and protected, applying the national sanitary regulations in force," explains the document issued by the union.

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The statement adds that "... this sanitary rigor must always be applied with the primary objective of seeking the food safety of our consumers with attachment to what this reality demands."

Anavip reiterates the need to maintain a healthy, fair, symmetrical, reciprocal and sustainable commercial flow, always recognizing the need for commercial exchange of complementary products so that both countries are benefited, the document concludes.



More on this topic

Trade: Costa Rica Acts Against Panama

January 2021

As a result of the blockade to the entrance to the Panamanian market of products of animal origin coming from Costa Rica, on January 11 the Costa Rican government requested to the WTO the application of the mechanism of consultation with Panama.

The trade conflict began in July 2020, when Panama informed the National Animal Health Service (SENASA), an agency of the Costa Rican Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG), of the decision not to extend the export authorization to a list of Costa Rican establishments previously authorized and which have been trading in the Panamanian market for many years.

Movements in Regional Commercial Chess

August 2020

The blockade to the entrance of products of animal origin coming from Costa Rica to the Panamanian market, has derived in a commercial conflict in which both countries have their share of responsibility, since the authorities of both nations advocate for protectionist measures.

On July 10, 2020, Panama informed the National Animal Health Service (SENASA), an agency of the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock of Costa Rica (MAG), about the decision not to extend the authorization for export to a list of Costa Rican establishments previously authorized and that have been commercializing in the Panamanian market for many years.

Entrepreneurs Support Trade Dispute

August 2020

After the Panamanian government agreed to ban the entry of animal products from Costa Rica, Panamanian businessmen supported the measure and asked to discuss the export and import requirements, since they claim that their agricultural products are prevented from accessing the Costa Rican market.

The trade dispute began when on July 10 Panama informed the National Animal Health Service (SENASA) of the Costa Rican Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG) of the decision not to extend export authorization to a list of previously authorized Costa Rican establishments that have been exporting to Panama for many years.

Trade Dispute Between Panama and Costa Rica

August 2020

Following Panama's blockade of the entry of animal products from Costa Rica, arguing that the permits have expired, Costa Rican authorities decided to notify the World Trade Organization of the dispute.

On July 10, Panama informed the National Animal Health Service (SENASA) of Costa Rica's Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG) of the decision not to extend export permits to a list of previously authorized Costa Rican establishments that have been exporting to Panama for many years.

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