Trade: Costa Rica Acts Against Panama

As a result of the blockade to the entrance to the Panamanian market of products of animal origin coming from Costa Rica, on January 11 the Costa Rican government requested to the WTO the application of the mechanism of consultation with Panama.

Friday, January 15, 2021

The trade conflict began in July 2020, when Panama informed the National Animal Health Service (SENASA), an agency of the Costa Rican Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG), of the decision not to extend the export authorization to a list of Costa Rican establishments previously authorized and which have been trading in the Panamanian market for many years.

See "Movements in Regional Commercial Chess"

After six months without progress in the process of resolving the conflict, the Costa Rican government decided to send a request to open the consultation mechanism to the World Trade Organization (WTO).

The official document published by the WTO details the request for the consultations "... in relation to measures adopted by Panama that restrict or prohibit the import of various products from Costa Rica, including
(i) strawberries
(ii) dairy, beef; pork; processed poultry; sausages of bovine, porcine and poultry origin (including hams, sausages, bologna, pork bacon, pork sausage, chicken and turkey, pepperoni pate, salami, sausage, leg, rib, pork loin, roast beef and beef loin); prepared beef, pork and chicken, chicken and turkey breast, pork crackling and dried sausage; as well as fish food
(iii) pineapple
(iv) banana and plantain.
"

See full WTO document.

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