The Energy is There But Not The Transmission Line

The lack of an electrical transmission line from hydropower plants in Chiriquí stands out against the backdrop of energy rationing being suffered in Panama.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Meanwhile, the Electricity Transmission Company (Etesa) will have to compensate the losses which the generators AES Panama and ENEL Fortuna "... could experience with the delay in the commissioning of the third power transmission line which will connect Chiriqui, where most of the energy is generated, with Panama, the main center of consumption in the country."

An article in Prensa.com reports that "... The third transmission line was tendered and awarded last year to the construction company Norberto Odebrecht for $233 million. However, this investment was planned in 2009 in Etesa's expansion plan, but since then has not materialized. "

A report published by the Cabinet of the Presidency of Panama states that "... The Cabinet Council authorized the conclusion of two agreements between the Ministry of Economy and Finance (MEF) and the companies ENEL FORTUNA SA and AES Panama SA, in order to mitigate loses suffered or which are likely to be suffered as a result of the delay in the construction of the extension of the third power transmission line.



More on this topic

The Road for Power Generation in Panama

May 2015

The exhaustion of the potential of hydroelectricity and social resistance to its use, is bringing to the forefront alternative energy as a solution to meeting electricity demand which is growing at 5% a year.

Energy imports from Central America and Colombia, through the interconnection network and the possibility of building more thermal power plants and renewable options are choices the country has to meet future electricity demand, not only because of social opposition to hydroelectric projects, but also because of the lack of rivers with enough channels to operate a dam.

Analysis of Electricity Sector in Central America

July 2014

In 2013 63% of the electrical energy fed into the transmission networks in the region was generated from renewable sources.

From a report entitled "Central America: production statistics for the electricity subsector, 2013", prepared by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC):

Panama Rethinks Interconnection with Colombia

October 2013

Among the plans to deal with the growing demand for electricity is building a fourth distribution line.

This would allow to maximize the capacity of energy flow and the transmission lines for Colon and Darien. There is also renewed interest in the proposed interconnection with Colombia, focusing on aspects such as lower costs, greater optimization and good roads.

Panama: $483 million in Electricity Distribution

April 2013

The expansion program of the electrical system in Panama foresees investments from Empresa de Transmisión Eléctrica S.A. of $483 million over the next eight years.

"Of this total, $395 million, or 81%, will be spent between 2013 and 2016. Included in this period is the construction of a third power transmission line from the Chiriqui province, to the capital city," reported Prensa.com.

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