How to Manage the Company's Talent in the Future

Companies recognize how important managing a growing international and mobile workforce is for the future of their businesses, but they do not know how to do it.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Companies do not have an appropriate strategy to deal with the transformation that is happening the way of working in the world -from the convergence of five generations to operations spread across the planet- which will lead to a crisis in management, attraction and retention of talent, concludes the Workforce 2020 study, prepared by Oxford Economics and SAP.

After surveying more than 5,400 employees and directors and personally interviewing 29 companies operating in 27 countries, Oxford Economics found that two thirds of the participating companies have made little progress in shaping a workforce capable of meeting its future business objectives.

SAP's statement adds that "... most of the companies surveyed recognize the importance of proper management of their increasingly diverse, international and mobile workforces. However, most lack the strategies, culture and solutions that would promote the use of the inherent opportunities. After surveying more than 5,400 employees and directors and personally interviewing 29 companies operating in 27 countries, Oxford Economics found that two thirds of the participating companies have made little progress in shaping a workforce capable of meeting its future business objectives."

Read the full report here.



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