Clear Road Ahead for Impunity

The way in which the Guatemalan Congress approved reforms to the Penal Code, "suggests that its objective could be to ensure impunity in the country and through this take a backwards step in the fight for a true and effective Rule of Law."

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Although President Morales said he was ready to analyze the reforms approved and veto them if they proved to be "harmful to the people of Guatemala," the very fact that Congress has approved them with such speed and simplicity reflects the delicate political crisis that the country is in.

According to the Attorney General's Office, decrees 14-2017 and 15-2017 that reformed the Criminal Code "... enhance lack of transparency in the management of resources from electoral financing, as well as the commutation of prison terms, because they promote impunity and prevent the fight against corruption ... and constitute a stimulus for the commission of common crimes."

Now we have to wait for the decision of the Constitutional Court, which by the end of the afternoon of Thursday 14, had already received five appeal suits against the reforms.

See articles on Prensalibre.com: " Constitutional Court appeals to Congress to deliver report " (In Spanish)

"Sectors reject corruption pact and ask Morales to veto decrees" (In Spanish)  

From a statement issued by the Chamber of Agriculture:

Guatemala, September 13, 2017. With approval of Reforms to Criminal Laws approved today by the Congress of the Republic of Reforms according to Decrees 14-2017 and 15-2017, we state:

1.  Total opposition to the way in which these reforms were issued, since this suggests that their objective could be to assure impunity in the country and with this take a backwards step in the fight for a true and effective Rule of Law.

Read full press release (in Spanish).

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