Call for Caution in Fight Against Corruption

After the Salvadoran president announced the possible installation of an International Commission against Corruption and Impunity, the business sector asked to "evaluate the experiences of Guatemala and Honduras.”

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

After Bukele reported that before his 100 days in office he would present a proposal to install an international commission in the country, the National Association of Private Enterprise (ANEP) said it is essential to comply with the law and that there must be real political will to fight corruption.

However, the businessmen's guild assured that "... it is unaware of the details of the Executive Branch's proposal for the installation of an International Commission against Corruption and Impunity in El Salvador (CICIES), but it was in favor of a national commission that has the backing of international organizations.

You may be interested in "Guatemala: CICIG's Withdrawal Impact

Laprensagrafica.com reviews that "... In its statement, ANEP welcomed the work of the Office of the Attorney General of the Republic in the fight against corruption, and asked to evaluate the experiences of Guatemala and Honduras in terms of effectiveness and political, social and democratic costs of similar institutions. In addition, it recalled that as a trade union, they have presented anti-corruption proposals at the National Meetings of Private Enterprise (ENADE) held in 2012 and 2016."

In the case of Guatemala, the International Commission against Impunity (CICIG) was not renewed and will come to an end next September, after more than a decade of being in the country.

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